US: 19th Amendment Centennial

The 19th Amendment: A Woman’s Right to Vote

From 2019-2020, the US will celebrate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment and women’s constitutional right to vote.

Suffragists began their organized fight for women’s equality in 1848 when they demanded the right to vote during the first women’s rights convention in Seneca Falls, New York. For the next 72 years, women leaders lobbied, marched, picketed, and protested for the right to the ballot. The U.S. House of Representatives finally approved the Susan B. Anthony Amendment, which guaranteed women the right to vote, on May 21, 1919. The U.S. Senate followed two weeks later, and the 19th Amendment went to the states, where it had to be ratified by 3/4ths of the-then-48 states to be added to the Constitution. By a vote of 50-47, Tennessee became the last state needed to ratify the 19th Amendment on August 18, 1920. Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby issued a proclamation declaring the 19th Amendment ratified and part of the US Constitution on August 26, 1920, forever protecting American women’s right to vote.

Today, more than 68 million women vote in elections because of the courageous suffragists who never gave up the fight for equality. Explore the resources below to learn more about the story of the 19th Amendment and women’s fight for the ballot.

I Vote: 100 Years of the 19th Amendment

19th Amendment

19th Amendment By State

19th Amendment Centennial of Women’s Right to Vote

Looking Beyond the 19th Amendment

Remember the women who fought for and won the right to vote

Social Movement Changing America: Legacies of the 19th Amendment

Symbols of the Women’s Suffrage Movement

Tennessee and the 19th Amendment

The Extension of Voting Rights in the United States

The Nudge And Tie Breaker That Took Women’s Suffrage From Nay To Yea

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